Liked Make your own automatic blogroll by Chris AldrichChris Aldrich (danmckinley.name via Boffosocko)

Make your own automatic blogroll

This is the script I use to generate a blogroll from my OPML:

#! /usr/bin/env python3
"""
Parse OPML into markdown.
"""
import sys
import re
from xml.etree import ElementTree


def main(fname):
    with open(fname, 'r', encoding='utf8') as fp:
        tree = ElementTree.parse(fp)
    for cat_node in tree.find('body').findall('outline'):
        print("\n## {}\n".format(cat_node.get('title')))
        for node in cat_node.findall('outline'):
            name = node.attrib.get('text')
            feedurl = node.attrib.get('xmlUrl')
            url = node.attrib.get('htmlUrl')
            print("* [{}]({}) ([feed]({}))".format(name, url, feedurl))


if __name__ == "__main__":
    main(*sys.argv[1:])

Replied to Michelle Breen, ALAI on Twitter (Twitter)

“UL Library is going to be a hive of activity with these workshops running for the first few weeks of semester 2 https://t.co/cK05VZCwYl We hope people like what we’re offering and that it chimes with what they asked for in @INDExSurvey @daveymoloney @sharonlflynn #Take1Step https://t.co/CWo04LTfWE”

Fantastic opportunities for students @UL to enhance their #digitalskills and competences being offered by colleagues @ULLibrary 👨‍💻👩‍💻Very much chimes with aims of #IUADigEd and what our students sought in the #INDExSurvey
Eyes peeled for the full schedule 👀
@UL_StudentLife

Bookmarked Check, Please! Starter Course by Daniel LyndsDaniel Lynds

In this course, we show you how to fact and source-check in five easy lessons, taking about 30 minutes apiece. The entire online curriculum is two and a half to three hours and is suitable homework for the first week of a college-level module on disinformation or online information literacy, or the first few weeks of a course if assigned with other discipline-focused homework.

Once students have completed the starter course they can move on to any number of additional topical modules we will be rolling out. The topical modules go into more depth on skills, and explore specific social issues around information pollution.

Each lesson has multiple pages and activities. After clicking through to each lesson, you can use the list of links at the bottom of the first page to navigate, or just click through using the “Next up:” link under the main text.

This looks like a fantastic resource, must take time to check it out fully. Daniel hat tips to Mike Caulfield.

Liked EUA on Twitter (Twitter)

“.@Nuffic 🇳🇱 released 2 new publications on recognition of #eLearning following the outcomes of the e-VALUATE project:
1⃣ Practioner’s Guide for the recognition of e-learning.
2⃣ Academic recognition of e-learning.
Find them here: https://t.co/RPG2sjW0rs #EHEA #OnlineLearning”

Bookmarked Social Media Alternatives

The Social Media Alternatives Project (S-MAP) is comprised of two parts. First, there is a blog exploring developments in alternative social media. That is, sites that are built due to criticisms of mainstream social media sites such as Facebook, Google+, and Twitter. Notable examples of these sites include Diaspora, Quitter, and Lorea. The blog will discuss these sites and detail research on them.

Second, the S-MAP will house an archive of screenshots and data about alternative social media. This is meant to be a resource for scholars who are studying these alternatives, as well as for those who want to build their own alternatives to Facebook, Twitter, and Google.

Bookmarked The OLM Mixer (uimagine – Charles Sturt University, Australia)

Getting the Balance Right: Applying the Online Learning Model to Teaching Practice

Teaching, like composing music, is as much art as science. There are many elements to balance and discord occurs if any one of the elements is in the wrong relationship to another. Technology has introduced a range of new possibilities to the teaching space but in doing so it introduces further opportunities for potential dissonance. There is no magic formula for creating fabulous music, or fabulous learning experiences, but there are principles that we know will work and combinations of elements that form pleasing patterns which we can repeat.

When composing, performing and recording a piece of music successful patterns and sound combinations used in the past are rethought and built on through a process of careful selection in the context of current practice and new ways of hearing and thinking about music. As educators we need to go through a similar process. Just as a musician builds on a personal history of scholarly expertise and immersion in music experience, developing a sense of the repertoires that please their ear and the ears of others, educators take the patterns of successful experiences and research of the past and recombine them in the new contexts of today to find the right balance for harmonious, or thrilling learning experiences.

The Online Learning Model proposed by CSU highlights seven elements composing a potential learning experience. These elements have been identified through prior experience and research to contribute to the composition of high quality learning experiences. They are not a mathematical formula that can be applied to every situation uniformly, the balance between the elements and the unique context of various courses determines the appropriate expression of each element. Educators must make the judgement calls at many stages along the way of planning, composing and performing learning experiences. They must weigh the needs of the experience and judge which elements to engage with in greater depth and which ones will provide better support with a lighter touch.

The OLM Mixer

Bookmarked The OLM Mixer
"Teaching, like composing music, is as much art as science. There are many elements to balance and discord occurs if any one of the elements is in the wrong relationship to another. Technology has introduced a range of new possibilities to the teaching space but in doing so it introduces further opportunities for potential dissonance. There is no magic formula for creating fabulous music, or fabulous learning experiences, but there are principles that we know will work and combinations of elements that form pleasing patterns which we can repeat."