2019-04-09 08.30.19

Read Read “hands-on digital skills” by Melissa Highton (Melissa Highton – University of Edinburgh)

This blog is another about some more institutionally provided technologies. #openblog19

At University of Edinburgh we know that our people are our strength. This is a place of knowledge creation, and a place of knowledge sharing. It is a place in which we invest in the digital skills of our staff and students. It is true in any job that there is a need for learning and development and when you work in the digital sector the need is even more urgent in a rapidly changing environment.

As Director of Learning, Teaching and Web Services I am lucky to have responsibility not only for the institutionally provided learning technology, but also the institutionally provided digital skills training provision. You know me, I like to have a strategy or framework for such things.

Our strategic investment in Lynda.com has been a huge success. The digital skills training team are excellent and they have invested the kind of time and effort in managing this service for the institution which has brought us return in terms of take-up and impact which puts us at the forefront of the UK HE sector.

All staff and student at University of Edinburgh are offered an account with Lynda.com. We’ve seen a steady increase over 3 years to the current 15,000 users.

📜 Read “hands-on digital skills” blogpost

by Melissa Highton

2019-04-09 08.23.59

Read Read “voices from the institution” by Melissa Highton (Melissa Highton – University of Edinburgh)

This blog is for Amber because she wants to know about institutionally provided technologies #openblog19

At University of Edinburgh we know that our people are our strength. This is a place of knowledge creation, and a place of knowledge sharing.

As Director of Learning, Teaching and Web Services I am lucky to have responsibility not only for the institutionally provided learning technology, but also the institutionally provided Web. You know me, I like to have a strategy for such things.

📜 Read “voices from the institution” blogpost

by Melissa Highton

2019-04-08 08.17.11

Liked Simon Horrocks on Twitter (Twitter)

“So, rather belatedly, a post following @neilwithnell’s #OpenBlog19 challenge to write something on ‘The most valuable lesson I ever learned’. I hope you can find a little time to read it… https://t.co/2SxGMuQF9Y”

2019-04-08 08.14.44

Read Read “The most valuable lesson I ever learned #OpenBlog19” by an author (follow the dot – Simon Horrocks)

So it’s over a fortnight since Neil Withnell challenged me to write a post with this title as my contribution to #OpenBlog19. At that point I didn’t even have a blog (or at least it wasn’t live) but I knew I’d get round to it eventually. Which is ironic, or at least it might be ironic in a minute when I’ve explained.

The title feels a bit like a TED Talk topic if I’m honest but here goes. The most valuable lesson I ever learned… is you need to spend time on the right stuff. In higher education, as in life, time is a precious resource and all too often I think we don’t care enough about how we spend it. If you have a minute (ahem), let me give some examples:

📜 Read “The most valuable lesson I ever learned” #OpenBlog19

by Simon Horrocks

2019-03-29 18.10.41

Read Read post “Institutional values and institutional behaviours: an open letter to Alison Johns (CEO of Advance HE)” by shorrock – follow the dot (follow the dot)

The reason I was writing was that Advance HE had run an event earlier that day about the preparedness of higher education for the fourth industrial revolution with the title and associated hashtag #BraveNewWorld. I wasn’t at the event myself but I was following the Twitter back-channel with interest when I picked up on a suggestion that there was something rather unbalanced about the programme: it was suggested that there were twelve men speaking at the event but no women. Twelve men, no women.

📜 Read “Institutional values and institutional behaviours: an open letter to Alison Johns (CEO of Advance HE)”

by Simon Horrocks

2019-03-26 13.17.35

Replied to Reply to Anne-Marie Scott on Twitter (Twitter)

“Blogged: Some myths by which we live https://t.co/AOw8gzUko6 My contribution to #openblog19 thinking about “institutionally provided technologies” With thanks to @ambrouk”

Really interesting and informative post 👏 learned a lot from this thanks  #OpenBlog19

2019-03-26 13.12.57

Read Read “Some myths by which we live” by Anne-Marie Scott (ammienoot.com)

“I have always argued that we can’t live by or be made to exist outside of mythology, and that every group and nation has, possibly unacknowledged to themselves, some myths by which they live…

📜 Read “Some myths by which we live” #OpenBlog19

by Anne-Marie Scott

2019-03-26 10.35.13

Read Read Is sharing caring? – #OpenBlog19 by Neil Withnell (Neil Withnell)

Being a strong advocate of open education, and the desire for education to be freely available to everyone, the answer is relatively easy.

Following a career as a qualified nurse (a caring profession, so yes I care) I entered the world of Higher Education (some 16 years ago) and recall my first few days. I was nervous, as I was new to teaching, but was constantly reassured by more experienced colleagues who shared their work to support me. Yes, I was an experienced nurse but a little out of my comfort zone with some of the topics within the curriculum, this sharing by colleagues was caring.

📜 Read Is sharing caring? – #OpenBlog19

by Neil Withnell

2019-03-26 10.20.43

Read Read Doing Digital Transformation #OpenBlog19 by Scott Turner (apslandt.blogspot.com – Scott Turner)

As someone whose career and interests revolve around Science, Engineering, Computing and how we teach these subjects, it is not going to be a surprise to anyone that I see the digital transformation as a largely exciting. But, I am not entirely sure though I know what exactly it means.

2019-03-25 09.17.43

Read Read #OpenBlog19: The library of the future is… by Maren Deepwell (Maren Deepwell)

The library of the future is a place where you can find what you are looking for. A place in which to discover the unexpected. A refuge in which you can retreat from the world and find peace and quiet and contemplation. The library of the future is somewhere you can loose hours, days or whole years to following the red thread of inspiration.

The library of the future is free and open to all.

2019-03-22 10.50.33

Liked Chris Aldrich on Twitter (Twitter)

“@daveymoloney I’m glad there’s some more modern research around this general idea. The reliance of humans on the power of visual memory goes back to ancient Greece with the method of loci and from the Renaissance (or earlier) with the mnemonic major system. [more…]
https://t.co/Q447tpYwa4”